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Fall 2017 Graduate Courses

Quick Links to Fall 2017 Graduate Course Schedules

French Graduate

Spanish Graduate

RLL Graduate

French Graduate Course Descriptions

Fr 525 Special Topics:  Cultural Criticism Today: Literature, Media, Philosophy

Professor David Castillo
Meetings: T 4:00-6:40 pm
Class #22625

This course examines a range of approaches to cultural criticism in our age of inflationary media. It will focus on the question of truth and the need for reality literacy in an increasingly fundamentalist market society. Key readings include the online collection http://openhumanitiespress.org/books/download/Marder-Vieira_2017_The-Philosophical-Salon.pdf., the print volume Medialogies: Reading Reality in the Age of Inflationary Media, and a selection of literary works and audiovisual material. Students are encouraged to draw connections with their own fields of inquiry in their class presentations and written essays.

Fall 2017:  required for incoming RLL graduate students.

FR 526 May 68 (1960-2020)
Professor Jean-Jacques Thomas
Meetings: T 4:00-6:40 pm
Class #15997

Fifty years later, May ’68 still inspires debate. Was it the historical moment when the generation of the ‘baby boomers’ finally reached the age of reason? Was it the time that a traditionally agrarian French society reached the end of its natural life and moved towards the Americanization of France and the spread of narrow-minded consumerism?   Was it the birth of a new epistemology , the so-called ‘La pensée 68’ ?  Or was it simply the guise of a sophomoric national animal house to obtain coed  residences at Nanterre University in this new age of the ‘pill’ and otherwise global sexual revolution? It is the purpose of  this seminar to look at the events of May ’68 and to consider it a moment with an extraordinary intellectual capital that will shape France during the second part of the 20th-century. Through the study of exemplary major theoretical texts of the period, new experimental narratives, the ‘New Wave’ film revolution  and minimalist and art brut artistic movements of the late ‘60s, we will trace the archeology of the continental reflection  and understand how many of the intellectual innovations established at that time are now natural components of our everyday life and common way of thinking.

Spanish Graduate Course Descriptions

SPA 509 Latin American Colonial Literature
Professor Stephanie Schmidt
Meetings: TR 2:00-3:20 pm
Class #20734

This course examines European, indigenous, and creole perspectives on conquest, evangelization, native traditions, and colonial experience in Latin America. We will pay close attention to questions of just war, religious syncretism, indigenous cultural realities and continuities, and an emerging creole consciousness.

SPA 510 Special Topics: Cultural Criticism Today:  Literature, Media, Philosophy
Professor David Castillo
Meetings: T 4:00-6:40 pm
Class #22625

This course examines a range of approaches to cultural criticism in our age of inflationary media. It will focus on the question of truth and the need for reality literacy in an increasingly fundamentalist market society. Key readings include the online collection http://openhumanitiespress.org/books/download/Marder-Vieira_2017_The-Philosophical-Salon.pdf., the print volume Medialogies: Reading Reality in the Age of Inflationary Media, and a selection of literary works and audiovisual material. Students are encouraged to draw connections with their own fields of inquiry in their class presentations and written essays.

Fall 2017:  required for incoming RLL graduate students.

SPA 533 Fiction, Truth, and Post-Truth:  Hispanic Literature
Professor Colleen Culleton
Meetings: R 4:00-6:40 pm
Class #20153

In 2016, Oxford Dictionaries declared post-truth (la posverdad in Spanish) as the international word of the year. Defined as “relating to or denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief,” post-truth is understood to have been a significant factor in the surprising Brexit vote in the U.K., the Trump election in the U.S., and the FARC referendum in Colombia. For literary scholars, post-truth is a new addition to an old lexicon that we deploy to talk about the relationship between words and reality, fiction and truth.  In this course we will study the contemporary operation of post-truth (and the related terms fake news and alternative facts) through the lenses of theoretical approaches that will include semiotics and theories of affect. And we’ll look to contemporary works of Hispanic fiction for insights into how we might decipher this post-truth world.

The course is conducted in Spanish. Short essays and a research paper will be submitted in Spanish. Readings are in Spanish and English.

SPA 534 Case and Aspect in L2 Spanish
Professor Jorge Guitart
Meetings:  W 4:00-6:40pm
Class #23633

This course, taught in English with all readings in English for maximal understanding, is aimed at promoting understanding among present and prospective teachers of Spanish as a second language of the differences between English and Spanish in the categories of grammatical case and aspect.  The course offers in a language that non-specialists can understand better explanations than the ones found in textbooks that are either incomplete or erroneous or both. The category of case includes areas such as the distinction between subject and object pronouns, passives and impersonals, constructions with se, the gustar-type  construction, and the contrast between ser and estar. The category of aspect focuses on the preterit/imperfect contrast. Class will be a flexible combination of lecturing, group discussion, and translation exercises.

RLL Graduate Course Description

RLL 526 Special Topics:  Cultural Criticism Today: Literature, Media, Philosophy

Professor David Castillo
Meetings:  T 4:00-6:40 pm
Class #24207

This course examines a range of approaches to cultural criticism in our age of inflationary media. It will focus on the question of truth and the need for reality literacy in an increasingly fundamentalist market society. Key readings include the online collection http://openhumanitiespress.org/books/download/Marder-Vieira_2017_The-Philosophical-Salon.pdf., the print volume Medialogies: Reading Reality in the Age of Inflationary Media, and a selection of literary works and audiovisual material. Students are encouraged to draw connections with their own fields of inquiry in their class presentations and written essays.

Fall 2017:  required for incoming RLL graduate students.