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Spring 2017 Graduate Courses

Quick Links to Spring 2017 Graduate Course Schedules

French Graduate

Spanish Graduate

RLL Graduate

French Graduate Course Descriptions

FR 525 Special Topic:  European Cinema
Professor Laura Chiesa
Meetings:  Tu 4-6:40
Class #20799

In this course we will study contemporary European films looking at their singular cinematic poetics and analyzing how several contemporary topics are framed and expressed, such as: immigration, social integration, the effects and efforts of EU new policies, violence and plurilingualism. The majority of the films will be French and Italian. The class will be taught in English and all movies will have at least English subtitles.

FR 526 French for Reading Knowledge
Professor Maureen Jameson
Meetings:  F 12:30-3:10 pm
Class #21466

French for Reading Knowledge is a pragmatic initiation to French designed to help prepare graduate students reach a basic level of understanding of French-language materials in their discipline. No prior knowledge of French is expected, but solid proficiency in English is helpful. The course offers a systematic introduction to the structure of French and some strategies for translation. A phonics handbook and audio resources will help demystify French pronunciation, but spoken French is not a major focus of the class.

FR 527 Tragic Choices
Professor Amy Graves-Monroe
Meetings:  W 4-6:40
Class #23175

This course explores the crux of the tragic as a question of choices and outcomes. It treats the plays as both structured by dilemma and filled with characters that are shaped by the choices the confront. Works may include those by Corneille, Racine, Voltaire, Hugo, Stendhal, Ionesco, Beckett, Camus, and Cixous.

FR 580 African and Caribbean Literature
Professor Christian Flaugh
Meetings:  Th 2:30-5:10 pm
Class #24051

This course covers works by modern writers from Africa, the greater Caribbean, and their interconnecting diasporas and transnational contexts.  A close look at storytelling traditions, aesthetic conventions, philosophical movements, and socio-political transformations helps students understand the ways in which texts of varied genres are created.  Students also compare works in order to tease out the differences and similarities in literature across African and Caribbean cultures.  They also relate them to movements and concepts like exotisme, la tradition orale, négritude, décolonisation, créolisation, rituel, littérature-monde.  By the end of the course students can articulate what it means to discuss terms like “Africa,” “Caribbean,” “diaspora,” and “transnational,” and how the contact of world cultures shape their contours.  They also gain a more thorough comprehension of the thought, lived experience, and artistic expression that lead to the writing of African and Caribbean literature.

Spanish Graduate Course Descriptions

SPA 506 Latin American Spanish Dialectology
Professor Jorge Guitart
Meetings:  W 4:00-6:40 pm
Class #23262

The course is an introduction to the diversity existing within the set of those natural languages that following sociopolitical-historical criteria can be labeled varieties of Latin American Spanish. The approach will combine traditional dialectology, linguistic theory, and sociolinguistic treatment. Special attention will be given to the Mexican, Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican varieties spoken in the United States. In general the main focus will be on phonological diversity (i.e., diversity in pronunciation), but attention will be given also to morphological, syntactic, and lexical diversity.

SPA 509 Poetics of the Passions in Medieval Iberia
Professor Henry Berlin
Meetings:  Tu 4-6:40 pm
Class #23278

In this seminar, we will explore affect as a rhetorical, political, and theo-philosophical phenomenon in the poetry of medieval Iberia. Initially grounding our readings in the classical, Occitan, Galician-Portuguese, and Arabic traditions (which will be available in Spanish or English translation), we will go on to examine a group of poets who portrayed collective affect as a crucial element of communal governance – and of cognition itself. Affect thus becomes, in their lyric and narrative poetry, a bridge between, on the one hand, political, religious, and literary community, and on the other, premodern models of subjectivity. Finally, our medieval readings will be complemented by contemporary ones in the history and theory of affect and the lyric.

SPA 510 Border Crossing in Latin America
Professor Justin Read
Meetings: Th 4:00-6:40 pm
Class #20471

In this seminar we will examine two key geopolitical concepts in Latin America:  “Border” and “Periphery”.  Borders are cartographic abstractions that delimit national sovereignty, but in themselves borders are in-between zones often marked by lawlessness.  Latin America as a region has been circumscribed by its position as a periphery or margin in world order.  We will start the seminar with a consideration of Mexican-American and Chicano culture, with particular attention to law(lessness) and technologies of power along the border. From there we will “migrate south,” in order to gauge how Latin American artists and intellectuals have questioned their own borders in terms of dependency, marginality, and displacement.

SPA 623 20th Century Novel:  Postwar & Contemporary Spanish Novel & Film
Professor Elizabeth Scarlett
Meetings:  TuTh 2:00-3:20 pm
Class # 23279

This course compares the discursive strategies of fiction and film from the mid-20th century to the present. In particular, it examines the evolution of the Spanish novel and the Spanish narrative motion picture through existentialist, social-realist, nouveau-roman/demythification, novela negra/film noir, and historical memory modes of narration. Authors and directors studied include Carmen Laforet, Camilo José Cela, Luis Buñuel, Juan Goytisolo, Carmen Martín Gaite, Carlos Saura, Pedro Almodóvar, Antonio Muñoz Molina, Alejandro Amenábar, Jaume Balaguero, and Icíar Bollaín.

RLL Graduate Course Description

RLL 525 European Cinema
Professor Laura Chiesa
Meetings:  Tu 4-6:40
Class #21722

In this course we will study contemporary European films looking at their singular cinematic poetics and analyzing how several contemporary topics are framed and expressed, such as: immigration, social integration, the effects and efforts of EU new policies, violence and plurilingualism. The majority of the films will be French and Italian. The class will be taught in English and all movies will have at least English subtitles.