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Spring 2018 Undergraduate Courses

Spring 2018 Undergraduate Courses

Quick Links to Spring 2018 Course Schedules

French Undergraduate

Italian Undergraduate

Spanish Undergraduate

French Undergraduate Course Descriptions

FR 101 Elementary French 1st Semester

Instructor: various
Meetings:  various
Class #10033, #23498
First semester of a one-year sequence course for true beginners.  This course is a communicative introduction to the language and its culture with attention to the development of aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.   Students will be able to understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of immediate relevance (e.g. personal and family information, shopping, leisure) as well as to communicate in simple form to complete tasks requiring exchange of information on familiar and routine topics.   The course is taught in the target language.

Prerequisite:   No previous study of the language

FR 102 Elementary French 2nd Semester
Instructor:  various
Meetings:  various
Class #10034, #10035, #10036

Continuation of the one-year sequence course for true beginners.

This course is a communicative introduction to the language and its culture with attention to the development of aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.   Students will be able to understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of immediate relevance (e.g. personal and family information, shopping, leisure) as well as to communicate in simple form to complete tasks requiring exchange of information on familiar and routine topics.  Students will also produce basic statements on wishes and opinions on familiar and routine topics.   The course is taught in the target language.

Prerequisite:  FR 101

FR 104 Transitional Elementary French
Instructor:  various
Meetings:  various
Class #10037,  #10038, #10039, #10040

One-semester intensive review of elementary French for students with 1+ years of high school language study or substantive background in another Romance language.

This course is a communicative introduction to the language and its culture with attention to the development of aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.   Students will be able to understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of immediate relevance (e.g. personal and family information, shopping, leisure).  Students will communicate in simple form to complete tasks requiring exchange of information on familiar and routine topics and to produce basic statements on wishes and opinions on familiar and routine topics.    The course is taught in the target language.

FR 151 Intermediate French 1st Semester (Lecture)
Instructor:  TBA
Meetings:  MWF 11-11:50 am
Class #10041

This course further develops oral and written expression in a cultural context.  Students will achieve higher proficiency through reading and discussing literary and non-literary texts, grammar review, writing assignments, and viewing films.   Students will produce simple connected texts on topics which are familiar or of personal interest.  Students will also describe experiences, ideas and give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.   This course will be taught in the target language.

Prerequisite:  3+ years of high school language, FR 101-102 or FR 104.

FR 151 Intermediate French 1st Semester (Recitation)
Instructor:  TBA
Meetings:  M 10-10:50 am
Class # 23213

French 151REC is a 1-credit optional course for students who are currently enrolled in FR 151LEC or who have taken FR 151LEC already. It provides further in-depth practice of the language skills developed in FR 151LEC. There will be extensive reading, writing, and conversation practice. Students who are doing the Language Track starting with FR 104, will benefit from this course to complete the 9-credit requirement of the track.

Pre-Requisites: FR 102 or FR 104
Co-Requisites: FR 151LEC

FR 152 Intermediate French 2nd Semester
Instructor:  various
Meetings:  various
Class #10042, #10043

Second semester of a one-year sequence intermediate level course.   This course further develops oral and written expression in a cultural context.  Students will achieve higher proficiency through reading and discussing literary and non-literary texts, grammar review, writing assignments, and viewing films.   Students will produce simple connected texts on topics which are familiar or of personal interest.  Students will also describe experiences, ideas and give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.   This course will be taught in the target language.

Prerequisite: FR 151

FR 212 Languages/Texts/Contexts II
Instructor:  Professor Maureen Jameson
Meetings:  MWF 12:00-12:50 pm
Class #14704

This course is part of the FR 211-FR 213 three-course module: these three courses can be taken in any order, they do not need to be taken sequentially. This particular course enriches specific intermediate-level skills for more advanced use: hypothesizing, navigation of uncertainty, and the perception and expression of both objectivity and subjectivity. Course goals are achieved through reading, discussion, and written analysis of texts like plays, films, music, interviews, and performances from the French-speaking world, as well as through debates and staged readings.

Prerequisites:  FR 152; or equivalent, as determined by RLL faculty advisor or placement at time of admission.  Students enrolled in or having complete at least two upper-level (FR 300/400) courses cannot take this course.

FR302 Survey of French Lit II
Instructor:  Professor Christian Flaugh
Meetings:  TTH 11:00 am-12:20 pm
Class # 14421

Acquaints students with the intersection of world civilizations in French language spaces from 1789 to contemporary times, through the close study of literary, cultural, and historical transformations. Situates texts and authors within and across contexts and movements such as: revolution, romanticism, orientalism, realism, the avant-garde, surrealism, Negritude, existentialism, the nouveau roman, decolonization, littérature-monde, and the production of citizenship. Writers may include Claire de Duras, Marceline Desbordes-Valmore, Honoré de Balzac, Charles Baudelaire, Alfred Jarry, Colette, Jean-Paul Sartre, Léopold Sédar Senghor, Marguerite Duras, Arianne Mnouchkine, Maryse Condé, and Leila Sebbar. Emphasizes and analyzes such questions through class discussion, research, presentations, performance, and written work. This course is in French.

Prerequisite: FR 211 OR FR 212 OR FR 213 OR FR 271 OR FR 270.Taught in French.

FR 305 Reading French Historians
Professor Maureen Jameson
Meetings: MWF 9-9:50 am
Class # 23236

This semester, the course will focus on the 19th-century French historian Jules Michelet. Learning French history will not be the main goal (though it is a desirable side effect); rather, we will identify the rhetorical strategies by means of which Michelet promotes his vision of French history. Our purpose will be to understand how the very same devices used by poets, playwrights, and novelists are skillfully deployed in the service of historical or political agendas, and thereby to raise our awareness of persuasive and coercive intent. Having devoted much effort to learning prescribed usage in grammar class, students in literature classes discover elective choices through which writers achieve aesthetic effects. In this class we will consider the extent to which the same elective choices serve politics or ideology in the writing of historians or politicians. This survey of Michelet’s writing will also prepare students to read original-language source texts in their History courses and in their independent reading. Taught in French.

Prerequisite:  FR 211 OR FR 212 OR FR 213 OR FR 271 OR FR 270.

FR 343 Advanced Communications for Students of French
Professor Jean-Jacques Thomas
Meetings: TTH 12:30-1:50 pm
Class # 21510

This course functions as a workshop where students strengthen knowledge and skills necessary for communication in fields and world regions where the French language is used. They learn to apply productive communicative processes (including revision) necessary for written work and presentations, describe the conventions they use, and make effective arguments in varied contexts. Students also refine their use of French and they cultivate a heightened sense of cross-cultural awareness. Similarly, they reflect on the usefulness of communication technologies (including formal writing and web communication) as tools for critical thought while they learn to use the language more carefully and purposefully. By the end of the course, students will be more thoroughly prepared to communicate, including in French, as well as articulate their own relationship to various genres, speech registers, and forms of communication. The class is mandatory for all French majors, and as of this year it satisfies the new UG curriculum “Communication Literacy 2” requirement. At least 75% of the class involves work in French.

Prerequisite:  FR 211 OR FR 212 OR FR 213 OR FR 271 OR FR 270.  Taught in French.

FR 481 Modern French Art Writing
Professor Fernanda Negrete
Meetings:  MWF 10-10:50 am
Class # 20528

This course examines writings by modern French authors about painting, music, photography, and other forms of modern art. Beginning with Baudelaire’s Le peintre de la vie moderne in 1865, we will examine the different modes of perception that Baudelaire and others after him explored, both by taking words to the limits of meaning and by revealing the creative potential in various kinds of non-verbal writing. How indeed are these other ways of sensing and reading essential to ‘modern life’? Some of the writers we will study are Henri Michaux, Samuel Beckett, Roland Barthes, and Hélène Cixous. In addition to reading and discussion, students in this course will undertake a creative experiment of their own throughout the semester.

Prerequisite: FR 211 OR FR 212 OR FR 213 OR FR 271 OR FR 270.Taught in French.

Italian Undergraduate Course Descriptions

ITA 101 Elementary Italian 1st Semester
Instructors:  Various
Meetings:  Various
Class #18700, #21199

First semester of a one-year sequence course for true beginners.  This course is a communicative introduction to the language and its culture with attention to the development of aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.   Students will be able to understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of immediate relevance (e.g. personal and family information, shopping, leisure) as well as to communicate in simple form to complete tasks requiring exchange of information on familiar and routine topics.   The course is taught in the target language.

Prerequisite:   No previous study of the language

ITA 102 Elementary Italian 2nd Semester
Instructor:  various
Meetings:  various
Class #16105, #20529, #19022, #17021, #23215, #19830

CONTINUATION OF 101. For students with no experience or less than a year experience in the language (true beginners). Students are encouraged to take their language courses upon entering UB.

Students must successfully complete 101 before registering into 102. Students who wish to retake the course to improve on their grade must do so prior to moving to 102.

ITA 104 Transitional Elementary Italian
Instructor:  TBA
Meetings:  MWF 11:00 am-12:25 pm
Class # 21595

Review of elementary level course material for students who have studied the language for a year or two in high school and/or passed a Regents Examination (or equivalent) in this language. Students who have successfully completed 101 and/or 102 cannot register in 104 as this is a course duplicate. Students wishing to retake the course to improve on their grade must do so prior to moving to the next level, 151. Students are encouraged to take their language courses upon entering UB.

ITA 151 Intermediate Italian 1st Semester (Lecture)
Instructor:  TBA
Meetings: MWF 1-1:50 pm
Class #19023

Previously ITA 203
This course is intended for students who have successfully completed 101-102 (or the equivalent at other institution) OR for those who have completed 3 or more years of language study in high school. This course will satisfy the General Education Requirement and the Depth Requirement. Students must successfully complete 151 before registering in 152. Students who wish to retake the course to improve on their grade must do so prior to moving to 152.

ITA 151 Intermediate Italian 1st Semester (Recitation)
Instructor:  TBA
Meetings: F 3-3:50 pm
Class #23217

Italian 151REC is a 1-credit optional course for students who are currently enrolled in ITA 151LEC or who have taken ITA 151LEC already. It provides further in-depth practice of the language skills developed in ITA 151LEC. There will be extensive reading, writing, and conversation practice. Students who are doing the Language Track starting with ITA 104 will benefit from this course to complete the 9-credit requirement of the track.

Prerequisites: ITA 102 or ITA 104 or equivalent, ITA 151 LEC; co-requisite: ITA 151 LEC.

ITA 152 Intermediate Italian 2nd Semester
Instructor:  Professor Paola Ugolini
Meetings:  MWF 10-10:50 am
Class #16214

Continuation course in the 151-152 sequence. Students must have successfully completed 151 (at UB or the equivalent at another institution) before registering into 152. No students are allowed into 152 without 151 (or the equivalent).

Transfer students check in taurus.buffalo.edu for articulation of language courses from other institutions. If your course is not in TAURUS, send a copy of the course syllabus to the language coordinator for appropriate placement (rll-info@buffalo.edu).

ITA 152 Intermediate Italian 2nd Semester Business
Instructor: TBA
Meetings:  MWF 10-10:50 am
Class #23216

Italian 152 BUS (Intermediate Italian for business – Second semester, continuation of Italian 151 BUS) provides a comprehensive picture of the Italian economic world. Readings and exercises will examine both cultural and practical aspects of the Italian economy. They will investigate how traditions and customs affect the country’s economy and they will also explain commercial terminology and business practices. Further practical topics will include analyzing and writing commercial documents and correspondence. The course will also provide a review of Italian grammar.​

ITA 322 Advanced Communication for Students of Italian
Instructor:  Professor Laura Chiesa
Meetings:  TTH 11:00 pm-12:20 pm
Class #21569

This course functions as a workshop where students strengthen knowledge and skills necessary for communication in fields and world regions where the Italian language is used. They learn to apply productive communicative processes (including revision) necessary for written work and presentations, describe the conventions they use, and make effective arguments in varied contexts. Students also refine their use of Italian and they cultivate a heightened sense of cross-cultural awareness. Similarly they reflect on the usefulness of communication technologies (including formal writing) as tools for critical thought while they learn to use the language more carefully and purposefully. By the end of the course, students will be more thoroughly prepared to communicate, including in Italian, as well as articulate their own relationship to various genres, registers, and forms of communication.

Pre-requisites: ITA 152 OR ITA 207. Taught in Italian

ITA 422 Modern Italian Literature
Instructor:  Professor Laura Chiesa
Meetings:  TTH 12:30-1:50 pm
Class #23404

Surveys poetry, prose fiction, and theatre from Leopardi and Manzoni to the present.

Spanish Undergraduate Course Descriptions

SPA 101 Elementary Spanish 1st Semester
Instructor: various
Meetings:  various
Class #10044, #10045

First semester of a one-year sequence course for true beginners.  This course is a communicative introduction to the language and its culture with attention to the development of aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.   Students will be able to understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of immediate relevance (e.g. personal and family information, shopping, leisure) as well as to communicate in simple form to complete tasks requiring exchange of information on familiar and routine topics.   The course is taught in the target language.

Prerequisite:   No previous study of the language

SPA 102 Elementary Spanish 2nd Semester
Instructor:  TBA
Meetings:  M-F 10-10:50 am
Class #10046, #10047, #10048, #10049

Continuation of the one-year sequence course for true beginners.

This course is a communicative introduction to the language and its culture with attention to the development of aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.   Students will be able to understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of immediate relevance (e.g. personal and family information, shopping, leisure) as well as to communicate in simple form to complete tasks requiring exchange of information on familiar and routine topics.  Students will also produce basic statements on wishes and opinions on familiar and routine topics.   The course is taught in the target language.

Prerequisite:  SPA 101

SPA 104 Transitional Elementary Spanish
Instructor: Various
Meetings:  Various
Class  #10050, #10051, #10052, #10053, #10054, #10055, #10057, #10058, #10060

Review of elementary level course material for students who have studied the language for a year or two in high school and/or passed a Regents Examination (or equivalent) in this language. This course satisfies the General Education Requirement. Students who have successfully completed 101 and/or 102 cannot register in 104 as this is a course duplicate. Students wishing to retake the course to improve on their grade must do so prior to moving to the next level, 151.
Students are encouraged to take their language courses upon entering UB.

SPA 151  Intermediate Spanish 1st Semester (Lecture)
Instructor:  Various
Meetings:  Various
Class #10061, #10063, #10064, #10065

This course is intended for students who have successfully completed 101-102 OR 104 (or the equivalent at other institution) OR for those who have completed 3 or more years of language study in high school. This course will satisfy the General Education Requirement and the Depth Requirement. Students must successfully complete 151 before registering in 152. Students who wish to retake the course to improve on their grade must do so prior to moving to 152.
SPA 151  Intermediate Spanish 1st Semester (Recitation)
Instructor:  Various
Meetings:  Various
Class #23209, #23210, #23211, #23212

Spanish 151REC is a 1-credit optional course for students who are currently enrolled in SPA 151LEC or who have taken SPA 151LEC already. It provides further in-depth practice of the language skills developed in SPA 151LEC. There will be extensive reading, writing, and conversation practice. Students who are doing the Language Track starting with SPA 104 will benefit from this course to complete the 9-credit requirement of the track.

Pre-Requisites: SPA 102 or SPA 104
Co-Requisites: SPA 151LEC

SPA 152 Intermediate Spanish 2nd Semester
Instructor:   Various
Meetings:  Various
Class #10066, #10067, #10068

Continuation course in the 151-152 sequence. Students must have successfully completed 151 (at UB or the equivalent at another institution) before registering into 152. No students are allowed into 152 without 151 (or the equivalent). Transfer students check in taurus.buffalo.edu for articulation of language courses from other institutions. If your course is not in TAURUS, send a copy of the course syllabus to the language coordinator for appropriate placement
(rll-info@buffalo.edu).

Prerequisite: SPA 151

SPA 207 Spanish Conversation & Language Workshop
Instructor:  various
Meetings:  various
Class #16257, #23447

This course focuses on the development of skills in oral expression and comprehension. Students will also review core grammar topics and complete regular short reading and writing assignments. SPA 207 & SPA 208 can be taken in either order, they do not need to be taken sequentially.

Prerequisite:  SPA 152; or equivalent, as determined by RLL faculty advisor or placement at time of admission.  No concurrent enrollment in SPA 101/102/104/151/152.

SPA 208 Spanish Conversation & Language Workshop
Instructor:  TBA
Meetings:  MWF 2:00-2:50 pm
Class #16128, #16114

This course focuses primarily on the development of writing skills, with an additional focus on reading comprehension and a review of advanced grammar topics. Students will also continue to develop their conversational abilities. SPA 207 & SPA 208 can be taken in either order, they do not need to be taken sequentially.

Prerequisite:  SPA 152; or equivalent, as determined by RLL faculty advisor or placement at time of admission.  No concurrent enrollment in SPA 101/102/104/151/152.

SPA 210 How to Read Spanish Text
Instructor: Professor Stephanie Schmidt
Meetings:  MWF 10:00-10:50 am
Class #14337

Develops students’ ability to analyze a piece of Spanish literature; considers prose and poetry from Peninsular Spanish and/or Spanish American literature.

Prerequisite:  SPA 152; or equivalent, as determined by RLL faculty advisor or placement at time of admission.  No concurrent enrollment in SPA 101/102/104/151/152.

SPA 314 Intensive Writing for Advanced Spanish Students
Instructor:  Professor Colleen Culleton
Meetings:  MWF 11:00 am-11:50
Class #21573

This course functions as a workshop where students strengthen knowledge and skills necessary for communication in fields and world regions where the Spanish language is used. They learn to apply productive communicative processes (including revision) necessary for written work and presentations, describe the conventions they use, and make effective arguments in varied contexts. Students also refine their use of Spanish, and they cultivate a heightened sense of cross-cultural awareness. Similarly they reflect on the usefulness of communication technologies (including formal writing) as tools for critical thought while they learn to use the language more carefully and purposefully. By the end of the course, students will be more thoroughly prepared to communicate, including in Spanish, as well as articulate their own relationship to various genres, registers, and forms of communication.

Pre requisites: SPA 152 OR SPA 207 OR SPA 208 OR SPA 210 OR SPA 215 OR SPA 216 OR SPA 221 OR SPA 225. Taught in Spanish.

SPA 323 Business Spanish
Instructor:  Professor Sharonah Fredrick
Meetings:  TTH 12:30-1:50 pm
Class #21571

Business Spanish provides a cultural, economic, and political snapshot of all the Spanish-speaking countries around the world, including the United States, which has more Spanish speakers than any other country except Mexico. Cultural readings examine how different attitudes toward money affect the way people conduct business. They also address how the concept of time, family traditions, and the climate influence a country’s economy. Practical topics may include correspondence, commercial terminology, readings, occasional translation of articles on financial subjects, discussions of documents, business customs, and practice in practical application. Requires oral participation.

Prerequisite: SPA 152 OR SPA 207 OR SPA 208 OR SPA 210 OR SPA 215 OR SPA 216 OR SPA 221 OR SPA 225. Taught in Spanish.

SPA 324 Medical and Health Related Spanish
Instructor: Professor Sharonah Fredrick
Meetings:  MWF 9-9:50 am
Class # 24015

Teaches the medical vocabulary and reinforces grammar usage so that students will be able to perform a medical check-up or counseling session in Spanish and/or be a first-responder in Spanish. Students will be able to discuss health care issues in Spanish and formulate informed opinions on health care policies in Hispanic contexts in the United States and abroad.

Prerequisite:  SPA 152 OR SPA 207 OR SPA 208 OR SPA 210 OR SPA 215 OR SPA 216 OR SPA 221 OR SPA 225.  Taught in Spanish.

SPA 327 Spanish Culture & Civilization
Instructor:  Professor Colleen Culleton
Meetings:  MWF 1-1:50 pm
Class #20549

Examines the history, geography, art, architecture, music, cuisine, and customs of Spain.

Prerequisite: SPA 152 OR SPA 207 OR SPA 208 OR SPA 210 OR SPA 215 OR SPA 216 OR SPA 221 OR SPA 225. Taught in Spanish.

SPA 409 Age of Lorca
Instructor: Professor Elizabeth Scarlett
Meetings:  TTH 2:00-3:30 pm
Class #23399

In this course, students will survey a fifty-year span of Spanish literature and culture known as the Silver Age. They will read and discuss texts from this period, centering on the figure of Federico García Lorca, but including his immediate predecessors and contemporaries, as well as follow-up on his impact into the present day. Students will learn theoretical approaches that can be employed to further interpretation and analysis of these texts. Students will also learn the essential features of the socio-historical context surrounding these figures.

SPA 452 Crossings and Transgression in the Colonial Americas
Instructor:  Professor Stephanie Schmidt
Meetings:  MWF 12:00-12:50 pm
Class #23448

This course examines themes of crossing, transgression, and transformation in the textual production of the early Americas. Moved by desire, zeal, misfortune, or captivity, the protagonists we encounter cross bodies of water, social barriers, positions of religion or gender, and between cultural spaces. Poetry and visual texts also reveal subject positions and cosmologies that transform through intercultural contact.

SPA 454 Special Topic: Spanish Subjunctive
Instructor: Professor Jorge Guitart
Meetings:  W 4:00-6:40 pm
Class #23402

The course is intended to provide information on the meaning and use of the subjunctive mood, which is considerable richer in Spanish than it is in English. In Spanish a conjugated verb form that is not a command, i.e., not in the imperative mood, is either in the indicative or the subjunctive. The subjunctive appears frequently with both the imperative and the indicative in complex sentences. The language of the course will be English and all readings will be in English. You will not have to buy any books: all reading material will be given to you free of charge. Class will be a flexible combination of lecturing, English-to-Spanish translation, small group discussion, and in-class quiz taking. There will be three take-home exams. Graduate students must write a ten-page critical review of an article on the subjunctive appearing in a professional journal after 2007.

SPA 481 Cuba Today
Instructor:  Professor Jorge Guitart
Meetings:  TTH 5-6:20 pm
Class # 23401

Cuba is the closest non-contiguous neighbor to the United States, but if you are a U.S. citizen, you are prohibited by law to go there as a tourist! It is not a Cuban law but a U.S. law that prevents you to go there just to have fun. If you were born in the U.S, and have a passport, the Cuban government will let you in and you won’t need a visa. Your money is welcome. Why the prohibition on tourism? Is it because Cuba is a communist country? Well, no. China and Vietnam are still communist countries and Americans can go there. Besides, American students are allowed to go to Cuba for purposes other than tourism (to study, do research, etc.) The present differences cannot be understood without knowledge of the history of U.S-Cuba relations, which have not always been satisfactory to both nations. That history extends to these days.