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Fall 2017 Undergraduate Courses

Quick Links to Fall 2017 Course Schedules

French Undergraduate

Italian Undergraduate

 

Spanish Undergraduate

RLL Undergraduate

French Undergraduate Course Descriptions

FR 101 Elementary French 1st Semester

Instructor: various
Meetings:  various
Class #17002, #19191, #16903

First semester of a one-year sequence course for true beginners.  This course is a communicative introduction to the language and its culture with attention to the development of aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.   Students will be able to understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of immediate relevance (e.g. personal and family information, shopping, leisure) as well as to communicate in simple form to complete tasks requiring exchange of information on familiar and routine topics.   The course is taught in the target language.

Prerequisite:   No previous study of the language


FR 102 Elementary French 2nd Semester
Instructor:  TBA
Meetings:  MWF 9-10:25 am
Class #19255

Continuation of the one-year sequence course for true beginners.

This course is a communicative introduction to the language and its culture with attention to the development of aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.   Students will be able to understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of immediate relevance (e.g. personal and family information, shopping, leisure) as well as to communicate in simple form to complete tasks requiring exchange of information on familiar and routine topics.  Students will also produce basic statements on wishes and opinions on familiar and routine topics.   The course is taught in the target language.

Prerequisite:  FR 101


FR 104 Transitional Elementary French
Instructor:  various
Meetings:  various
Class #15850,  #15852, #19200, #19192

One-semester intensive review of elementary French for students with 1+ years of high school language study or substantive background in another Romance language.

This course is a communicative introduction to the language and its culture with attention to the development of aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.   Students will be able to understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of immediate relevance (e.g. personal and family information, shopping, leisure).  Students will communicate in simple form to complete tasks requiring exchange of information on familiar and routine topics and to produce basic statements on wishes and opinions on familiar and routine topics.    The course is taught in the target language.


FR 151 Intermediate French 1st Semester (Lecture)
Instructor:  various
Meetings:  various
Class #17112, #16998, #19190

This course further develops oral and written expression in a cultural context.  Students will achieve higher proficiency through reading and discussing literary and non-literary texts, grammar review, writing assignments, and viewing films.   Students will produce simple connected texts on topics which are familiar or of personal interest.  Students will also describe experiences, ideas and give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.   This course will be taught in the target language.

Prerequisite:  3+ years of high school language, FR 101-102 or FR 104.

FR 151 Intermediate French 1st Semester (Recitation)
Instructor:  various
Meetings:  various
Class # 23454, 23455

French 151REC is a 1-credit optional course for students who are currently enrolled in FR 151LEC or who have taken FR 151LEC already. It provides further in-depth practice of the language skills developed in FR 151LEC. There will be extensive reading, writing, and conversation practice. Students who are doing the Language Track starting with FR 104, will benefit from this course to complete the 9-credit requirement of the track.

Pre-Requisites: FR 102 or FR 104
Co-Requisites: FR 151LEC

FR 152 Intermediate French 2nd Semester
Instructor:  TBA
Meetings:  MWF 1-1:50 pm
Class #21673

Second semester of a one-year sequence intermediate level course.   This course further develops oral and written expression in a cultural context.  Students will achieve higher proficiency through reading and discussing literary and non-literary texts, grammar review, writing assignments, and viewing films.   Students will produce simple connected texts on topics which are familiar or of personal interest.  Students will also describe experiences, ideas and give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.   This course will be taught in the target language.

Prerequisite: FR 151


FR 211 Languages/Texts/Contexts I
Instructor:  Professor Maureen Jameson
Meetings:  MWF 12:00-12:50 pm
Class #17369

This course is part of the FR 211-FR 213 three-course module: these three courses can be taken in any order, they do not need to be taken sequentially. This particular course enriches specific intermediate-level skills for more advanced use: hypothesizing, navigation of uncertainty, and the perception and expression of both objectivity and subjectivity. Course goals are achieved through reading, discussion, and written analysis of texts like plays, films, music, interviews, and performances from the French-speaking world, as well as through debates and staged readings.

Prerequisites:  FR 152; or equivalent, as determined by RLL faculty advisor or placement at time of admission.  Students enrolled in or having complete at least two upper-level (FR 300/400) courses cannot take this course.


FR 213 Languages/Texts/Contexts III
Instructor:  TBA
Meetings:  TR 11:00 am-12:20 pm
Class #19811

This course is part of the FR 211-FR 213 three-course module: these three courses can be taken in any order, they do not need to be taken sequentially. This particular course enriches specific intermediate-level skills for more advanced use: it focuses on investigating, persuading, and argumentation. It allows students to practice the forms of discourse necessary for defense and justification at the same time that it encourages critical thinking by scrutinizing and analyzing modes of persuasion intended to manipulate and evade.  Course goals are achieved through the study of texts like essays, novels, films, and performances coming from various social contexts for French-language cultures as well as through the honing of written and verbal skills of inquiry, research analysis and synthesis necessary for exploring texts and their contexts.

Prerequisites:  FR 152; or equivalent, as determined by RLL faculty advisor or placement at time of admission.  Students enrolled in or having complete at least two upper-level (FR 300/400) courses cannot take this course.

FR 301 Survey of French Lit I
Professor Fernanda Negrete
Meetings:  TR 9:30-10:50 am
Class #17325

Introduces students to major currents of French literature and thought in selected readings from the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Classical period, and Enlightenment. The study of epic (La Chanson de Roland), romance (Yvain ou le chevalier au lion), autobiographical writing (Montaigne’s Essais), classical tragedy and comedy (Racine and Moliere), the novel (La Princesse de Cleves and Candide), philosophical writing (selections from Descartes, Pascal, and Rousseau), and poetry (selections from Charles d’Orleans, Villon, Du Bellay, and Ronsard) emphasizes both literary and philosophical traditions, as well as textual interpretation.

Prerequisite:  FR 211 OR FR 212 OR FR 213 OR FR 271 OR FR 270.  Taught in French.


FR 341 Topics in French Film
Professor Jean-Jacques Thomas
Meetings TR 12:30-1:50 pm
Class #22293

The purpose of this course is to analyze contemporary French films. After a brief history of French cinema the goal of the course will be to understand  how a foreign culture represents its own attitude, language and cultural dispositions in a given situation. The course will lead to a better understanding of the French film industry and its adaptation to specifically pre­determined cultural patterns. Because this course can be repeated, each semester that it is offered its theme and films change. This Fall 2017 semester the topic is “Remakes / Reprises” and it explores international cross cultural patterns in cinematic fiction.  We will also study the general framework of the film representation and what distinguishes a “French” and an “American” film. The course will lead to a better knowledge of contemporary French cinema and an understanding of specifically pre­determined cultural patterns.  Course webpage

Prerequisite:  FR 211 OR FR 212 OR FR 213 OR FR 271 OR FR 270.  Taught in French.

FR 368 Modern World Drama
Professor Christian Flaugh
Meetings:  MWF 11:00-11:50 am
Class #23612

This course will explore the various performance traditions that inform the production of drama throughout the francophone world. Works under study will come from the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries and from performers and playwrights originally from world regions such as Africa, the Americas, the Caribbean, and Europe. The thought and the practice informing modern world drama will be explored through the close study of text and performance. This course is in French.

FR 475 Literature and Society
Professor Christian Flaugh
Meetings:  MWF 1:00-1:50 pm
Class # 23624

Performing Race Archives: Transatlantic Exhibits, Zoos, and Fairs of Buffalo & Paris

This course studies connections between performance, race, and archives embodied in and around the transatlantic history of exhibits, zoos, and fairs from the nineteenth century forward. Emphasis will be placed on archives about such performances in venues such as sideshows, surgical theatres, and especially the world¹s fairs in Buffalo (1901) and Paris (1889, 1900). We will discuss how these archives help us think critically about race and performance in a transatlantic context, and how such questions inform popular culture today. Students will learn how to consult such texts in context as well as create and perform their own texts in response. This course will be taught in English; French students will complete written assignments in French.

Italian Undergraduate Course Descriptions

ITA 101 Elementary Italian 1st Semester
Instructors:  Various
Meetings:  Various
Class #19866, #16953, #16886, #19115, #18989, #19279, #18374

First semester of a one-year sequence course for true beginners.  This course is a communicative introduction to the language and its culture with attention to the development of aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.   Students will be able to understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of immediate relevance (e.g. personal and family information, shopping, leisure) as well as to communicate in simple form to complete tasks requiring exchange of information on familiar and routine topics.   The course is taught in the target language.

Prerequisite:   No previous study of the language

ITA 102 Elementary Italian 2nd Semester
Instructor:  TBA
Meetings:  MWF 1:00-2:25pm
Class #19280

CONTINUATION OF 101. For students with no experience or less than a year experience in the language (true beginners). Students are encouraged to take their language courses upon entering UB.

Students must successfully complete 101 before registering into 102. Students who wish to retake the course to improve on their grade must do so prior to moving to 102.


ITA 104 Transitional Elementary Italian
Instructor:  TBA
Meetings:  MWF 9:00-10:25 am
Class #22238

One-semester intensive review of elementary Italian for students with 1+ years of high school language study or substantive background in another Romance language.

This course is a communicative introduction to the language and its culture with attention to the development of aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.   Students will be able to understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of immediate relevance (e.g. personal and family information, shopping, leisure).  Students will communicate in simple form to complete tasks requiring exchange of information on familiar and routine topics and to produce basic statements on wishes and opinions on familiar and routine topics.    The course is taught in the target language.


ITA 151 Intermediate Italian 1st Semester (Lecture)
Instructor:  various
Meetings: various
Class #18990, #19352

This course further develops oral and written expression in a cultural context.  Students will achieve higher proficiency through reading and discussing literary and non-literary texts, grammar review, writing assignments, and viewing films.   Students will produce simple connected texts on topics which are familiar or of personal interest.  Students will also describe experiences, ideas and give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.   This course will be taught in the target language.

Prerequisite:  3+ years of high school language, ITA 101-102 or ITA 104.


ITA 151 Intermediate Italian 1st Semester:  Business (Lecture)
Instructor:  TBA
Meetings: MWF 11:00-11:50 am
Class #23429

Italian 151 BUS (Intermediate Italian for business – First semester) provides a comprehensive picture of the Italian economic world. Readings and exercises will examine both cultural and practical aspects of the Italian economy. For example, they will investigate how traditions and customs affect the country’s economy, but they will also explain commercial terminology and business practices. Further practical topics will include analyzing and writing commercial documents and correspondence. The course will also provide a review of Italian grammar.

Prerequisite:  3+ years of high school language, ITA 101-102 or ITA 104.


ITA 151 Intermediate Italian 1st Semester (Recitation)
Instructor:  Professor Emanuela Pecchioli
Meetings: various
Class #23436

Italian 151REC is a 1-credit optional course for students who are currently enrolled in ITA 151LEC or who have taken ITA 151LEC already. It provides further in-depth practice of the language skills developed in ITA 151LEC. There will be extensive reading, writing, and conversation practice. Students who are doing the Language Track starting with ITA 104 will benefit from this course to complete the 9-credit requirement of the track.

Prerequisites: ITA 102 or ITA 104 or equivalent, ITA 151 LEC; co-requisite: ITA 151 LEC.

ITA 207 Conversation and Composition
Instructor:  TBA
Meetings:  MWF 10:00-10:50 am
Class #21121

This course reinforces and strengthens linguistic proficiency, cultural fluency and critical thinking skills in a focused and sustained manner. The course enriches specific intermediate-level skills for more advanced use: it targets description (people, objects, places), summary and narration of events in all time frames, and articulation and defense of an opinion in conversation and debate as well as in writing. The course goals are achieved through reading, discussion, and written analysis of magazine and newspaper articles, narrative prose, poetry, and also film from the Italian-speaking world as well as public speaking. An increasingly nuanced mastery of grammar, style, expression and gesture through activities carefully aligned with the course’s target areas also factors into the development of a critical voice and a sense of how meaning is created and transmitted.

ITA 415 Modern Novel from Manzoni to the Present
Instructor:  Professor Laura Chiesa
Meetings:  MWF 11:00-11:50 am
Class #23539

Involves a study of Manzoni’s masterpiece and subsequent monuments of Italian fiction. Surveys famous novels dealing with industrialization, alienation, and experimentalism. Taught in Italian.

AHI 150LR Avant Gardes
Instructor:  Professor Laura Chiesa
Meetings:  Lecture:  MW 9:00-9:50 am (required)
Recitation:  Class # 23926 AHI 150LR A 10:00-10:50 am OR
Class # 23927 AHI 150LR B 11:00-11:50 am OR
Class # 23928 AHI 150LR C 12:00-12:50 pm

Beginning in the late 19th Century a new cultural movement was born: the avant garde. This course seeks to understand how and why art and literature that deliberately challenged popular understanding came to be dominant. This course will introduce you to the main currents of 19th and 20th Century avant garde history, theory, and aesthetic practice. Grounding our approach in the specific geographic and historical conditions that gave rise to these individual movements, we will explore their expression through a wide variety of mediums including art and visual culture, literature, poetry, music, and film. We will read both primary and secondary documents as we grapple with these movements’ modernist and revolutionary agendas in order to assess their successes and failures and evaluate their impacts and legacies.

Spanish Undergraduate Course Descriptions

SPA 101 Elementary Spanish 1st Semester
Instructor: various
Meetings:  various
Class #16020, #16910, #19281, #19198, #16067

First semester of a one-year sequence course for true beginners.  This course is a communicative introduction to the language and its culture with attention to the development of aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.   Students will be able to understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of immediate relevance (e.g. personal and family information, shopping, leisure) as well as to communicate in simple form to complete tasks requiring exchange of information on familiar and routine topics.   The course is taught in the target language.

Prerequisite:   No previous study of the language


SPA 102 Elementary Spanish 2nd Semester
Instructor:  TBA
Meetings:  M-F 10:00-10:50 am
Class #19282

Continuation of the one-year sequence course for true beginners.

This course is a communicative introduction to the language and its culture with attention to the development of aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.   Students will be able to understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of immediate relevance (e.g. personal and family information, shopping, leisure) as well as to communicate in simple form to complete tasks requiring exchange of information on familiar and routine topics.  Students will also produce basic statements on wishes and opinions on familiar and routine topics.   The course is taught in the target language.

Prerequisite:  SPA 101


SPA 104 Transitional Elementary Spanish
Instructor: Various
Meetings:  Various
Class  #17128, #19867, #16839, #17046, #16875, #19193, #19209, #19194,  #16007

One-semester intensive review of elementary Spanish for students with 1+ years of high school language study or substantive background in another Romance language.

This course is a communicative introduction to the language and its culture with attention to the development of aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.   Students will be able to understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of immediate relevance (e.g. personal and family information, shopping, leisure).  Students will communicate in simple form to complete tasks requiring exchange of information on familiar and routine topics and to produce basic statements on wishes and opinions on familiar and routine topics.    The course is taught in the target language.


SPA 151  Intermediate Spanish 1st Semester (Lecture)
Instructor:  Various
Meetings:  Various
Class #17086, #17132, #17145, #19225

This course further develops oral and written expression in a cultural context.  Students will achieve higher proficiency through reading and discussing literary and non-literary texts, grammar review, writing assignments, and viewing films.   Students will produce simple connected texts on topics which are familiar or of personal interest.  Students will also describe experiences, ideas and give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.   This course will be taught in the target language.

Prerequisite:  3+ years of high school language, SPA 101-102 or SPA 104.

SPA 151  Intermediate Spanish 1st Semester (Recitation)
Instructor:  Various
Meetings:  Various
Class #23451, #23453

Spanish 151 REC expands on the language skills mastered in SPA 101 and 102 or 104. There will be a review of basic and complex grammatical and pronunciation patterns, intensive vocabulary expansion through literary and non-literary readings, and extensive conversation practice. SPA 151 REC provides further in-depth practice of the language skills developed in SPA 151 LEC. There will be extensive reading, writing and conversation practice.


SPA 152 Intermediate Spanish 2nd Semester
Instructor:   Various
Meetings:  Various
Class #18987, #19283

Second semester of a one-year sequence intermediate level course.   This course further develops oral and written expression in a cultural context.  Students will achieve higher proficiency through reading and discussing literary and non-literary texts, grammar review, writing assignments, and viewing films.   Students will produce simple connected texts on topics which are familiar or of personal interest.  Students will also describe experiences, ideas and give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.   This course will be taught in the target language.

Prerequisite: SPA 151


SPA 207 Spanish Conversation & Language Workshop
Instructor:  various
Meetings:  various
Class #20726, #18986

This course focuses on the development of skills in oral expression and comprehension. Students will also review core grammar topics and complete regular short reading and writing assignments. SPA 207 & SPA 208 can be taken in either order, they do not need to be taken sequentially.

Prerequisite:  SPA 152; or equivalent, as determined by RLL faculty advisor or placement at time of admission.  No concurrent enrollment in SPA 101/102/104/151/152.


SPA 208 Spanish Conversation & Language Workshop
Instructor:  TBA
Meetings:  MWF 2:00-2:50 pm
Class #15995

This course focuses primarily on the development of writing skills, with an additional focus on reading comprehension and a review of advanced grammar topics. Students will also continue to develop their conversational abilities. SPA 207 & SPA 208 can be taken in either order, they do not need to be taken sequentially.

Prerequisite:  SPA 152; or equivalent, as determined by RLL faculty advisor or placement at time of admission.  No concurrent enrollment in SPA 101/102/104/151/152.


SPA 210 How to Read Spanish Text
Professor Henry Berlin
Meetings:  MWF 10:00-10:50 am
Class #21605

Develops students’ ability to analyze a piece of Spanish literature; considers prose and poetry from Peninsular Spanish and/or Spanish American literature.

Prerequisite:  SPA 152; or equivalent, as determined by RLL faculty advisor or placement at time of admission.  No concurrent enrollment in SPA 101/102/104/151/152.


SPA 304 Early Spanish American Literature
Professor Stephanie Schmidt
Meetings:  TuTh 11:00 am-12:20 pm
Class #21166

This course covers works from the time of the encounter between Spain and the Americas, as well as from the colonial period. Readings and discussions will include historical and cultural issues.

Prerequisite:  SPA 152 OR SPA 207 OR SPA 208 OR SPA 210 OR SPA 215 OR SPA 216 OR SPA 221 OR SPA 225.  Taught in Spanish.


SPA 310 Introduction to Literary Criticism
Instructor:  Professor Justin Read
Meetings:  MWF 11:00-11:50 am
Class #23627

Introduces salient features of various critical methods, including their application to novels, plays, and poetry from Peninsular Spanish and/or Spanish American literature.

Prerequisite:  SPA 152 OR SPA 207 OR SPA 208 OR SPA 210 OR SPA 215 OR SPA 216 OR SPA 221 OR SPA 225.  Taught in Spanish.

SPA 311 Survey of Spanish American Literature
Professor Justin Read
Meetings:  MWF 1:00-1:50 pm
Class # 23632

Reviews Spanish American literature from the earliest times to the present.

Prerequisite:  SPA 152 OR SPA 207 OR SPA 208 OR SPA 210 OR SPA 215 OR SPA 216 OR SPA 221 OR SPA 225.  Taught in Spanish.

SPA 313 Advanced Grammar
Instructor:  TBA
Meetings:  TR 9:30-10:50 am
Class #22605

Examines grammatical categories of Spanish; provides extensive oral and written practice.

Prerequisite:  SPA 152 OR SPA 207 OR SPA 208 OR SPA 210 OR SPA 215 OR SPA 216 OR SPA 221 OR SPA 225.  Taught in Spanish.

SPA 324 Medical Spanish
Professor Elizabeth Scarlett
Meetings:  MWF 12:00-12:50 pm
Class #22370

Teaches the medical vocabulary and reinforces grammar usage so that students will be able to perform a medical check-up or counseling session in Spanish and/or be a first-responder in Spanish. Students will be able to discuss health care issues in Spanish and formulate informed opinions on health care policies in Hispanic contexts in the United States and abroad.

Prerequisite:  SPA 152 OR SPA 207 OR SPA 208 OR SPA 210 OR SPA 215 OR SPA 216 OR SPA 221 OR SPA 225.  Taught in Spanish.

SPA 325 Spanish Phonetics
Professor Jorge Guitart
Meetings:  TR 3:30-4:50 pm
Class #23961

Covers theory and practice of Spanish pronunciation; helps students develop near-native pronunciation.

Prerequisite:  SPA 152 OR SPA 207 OR SPA 208 OR SPA 210 OR SPA 215 OR SPA 216 OR SPA 221 OR SPA 225.  Taught in Spanish.

SPA 454 Special Topic: Case and Aspect in L2 Spanish
Professor Jorge Guitart
Meetings:  W 4:00-6:40 pm
Class #20733

This course, taught in English with all readings in English for maximal understanding, is aimed at promoting understanding among present and prospective teachers of Spanish as a second language of the differences between English and Spanish in the categories of grammatical case and aspect.  The course offers in a language that non-specialists can understand better explanations than the ones found in textbooks that are either incomplete or erroneous or both. The category of case includes areas such as the distinction between subject and object pronouns, passives and impersonals, constructions with se, the gustar-type  construction, and the contrast between ser and estar. The category of aspect focuses on the preterit/imperfect contrast. Class will be a flexible combination of lecturing, group discussion, and translation exercises.

Prerequisite:  SPA 152 OR SPA 207 OR SPA 208 OR SPA 210 OR SPA 215 OR SPA 216 OR SPA 221 OR SPA 225.  Taught in Spanish.

RLL Undergraduate Course Descriptions

RLL198PEC Cinema in Literature
Professor Emanuela Pecchioli
Meetings:  M 3:00-3:50 pm
Class #22433

The aim of this course is to present a global literary phenomenon across romance language world cultures that can be briefly described as the impact that the medium of cinema had and has on the medium of literature. In other words, we will look at how cinema influenced and influences literature and how it was and it is represented in literature in translation of romance language world regions. Therefore, during the course we will read and analyze novels translated into English that belong to this “genre” and we will read and discuss critical texts on this subject. Students will be encouraged to offer their own approach to the study of this literary trend and to suggest and examine other narratives that can belong to this literary phenomenon.

RLL199JAM Representation of Smoking and the Smoker
Professor Maureen Jameson
Meetings: MWF 9:00-9:50 am
Class #22233

The goal of the class is to identify and evaluate the image of tobacco and the tobacco user in representative selections from the literary, cinematic, and artistic traditions of French-, Italian-, and Spanish-speaking countries. In particular we will seek to trace how that image has evolved since the introduction of tobacco to Europe. Given its evolution and impact, tobacco use must be understood in a broad historical and social context; the course will therefore take into account economic and political factors as well as public health issues.

RLL199CUL Global Perspectives
Professor Colleen Culleton
Meetings:  TR 11:00 am- 12:20 pm
Class #22374

The globalized world presents a unique set of challenges to people who aspire to make well informed choices and act ethically. The dynamic space of globalization is one in which the reliability of information is constantly called into question, and our choices can have consequences for people in far away places whom we will never meet. In the broadest possible terms, the objective of this course is to help students think through how to be the people that they want to be in the context of globalization. In order to achieve that objective, students will pursue a series of readings that contextualize the workings of globalization.  Armed with that information, we will take on a series of topics that we’ll call “the forces of globalization”–the things that make the world go round. For each topic, in the manner of a case study, we’ll consider a challenge presented to the global community and a person or entity that is responding to that challenge. For each individual or organization that we consider, we’ll look at opportunities for volunteer work, internships, or employment that an interested person could pursue in the mid to long term.